Wednesday, July 27, 2016

NeilMed Naspira Nasal-Oral Aspirator - Review and Giveaway

If you have ever suffered from a common cold and everything that it entails, then you know just how frustrating and torturous it can be to go about your daily routines while battling with congested noses, sore throats and watering eyes. On the other hand, if its your toddler or baby who is suffering from congestion, then it becomes even more difficult to provide them with relief until the cold runs its course.
We have used a neti pot with our older son when he was around 4 -5 years of age, successfully to an extent. The neti pot definitely helped in gently flushing the nasal passages with warm saline water and seemed to have helped in reducing congestion and helping our son breathe better. But a toddler or a baby cannot use neti pots and the suction bulb can only help so much. 
I recently hear about the NeilMed Naspira Nasal Oral aspirator and was struck by its unique design. The aspirator is designed to help suction a baby's or a toddler's nose safely, gently and effectively.
I was offered a chance to use a kit and review it and I decided to give it a try.

Unlike the ubiquitous blue suction bulb that is provided by the hospital after a baby is born, the NeilMed aspirator is transparent and has a 2 in 1 design. You can either use it as an aspirator or as a nasal / oral suction device. Parents can use this device to generate suction force through the mouth to alleviate nasal congestion in their little ones.

Although my youngest is now 5 and can blow his nose by himself to clear any mucus that might accumulate, he did allow me to try the aspirator on him when he had a slight cold earlier in the month. When I tried to insert the tip of the aspirator into his nose, it took us a few tries just because he kept getting tickled by it! But once he had the hang of it, it was easy enough to gently use the aspirator to clear his nose. I can see how easy it would have been to use this product if he had been a few years younger.
The aspirator is made of high grade silicone and can be easily pulled apart for thorough cleaning. It can also be sterilized and disinfected easily by using boiling water or in the microwave.
The product has a life time warranty and is made without latex, pthalates or BPA. It is also dishwasher safe!!
The NeilMed Naspira Nasal Oral aspirator kit also includes 7 in-line disposable filters to prevent any mucus from entering the tubing and reaching the user's mouth.
The retail price of this kit varies from $9.99 to $14.99. The kit can be easily found at retailers such as Walmart, Babies R Us, Toys R Us, Rite Aid , Target and

Giveaway !! - 
GreenMomsMeet and NeilMed have graciously provided me with a few kits so that I can share them with any readers who might be interested in trying this out. Please leave me a comment with your name, email address and why you think this product might be useful to you! Give away closes in a week!!

For more information about the kit and other products from NeilMed, visit the following websites:

Disclaimer:I received this product for free from the sponsor of the Moms Meet program (greenmomsmeet. com), May Media Group LLC, who received it directly from the manufacturer. As a Moms Meet blogger, I agree to use this product and post my opinion on my blog. My opinions do not necessarily reflect the opinions of May Media Group LLC or the manufacturer of this product.

Monday, June 20, 2016

Harvest Monday - 6/20/2016

Summer has burst into the North Texas areas now. Temperatures are soaring during the day and nights are getting pretty warm too. It is typically an expected occurrence here and temperatures are already at the 98 / 99 F range with the worst of the summer yet to come.
Although I had sowed my seeds well in advance and prepared my beds by working in compost, the big mistake I made was not getting protection in place for my tiny gardening space. The rabbit population has increased drastically in my neighborhood and they need to get sustenance from somewhere! My unprotected raised beds are, therefore,  fair game. My okra plants have been all but decimated, only small twigs remaining in place of lush leaves. The green bean plants have been trampled over and several are broken. Its nobody's fault but mine! Lesson learned the hard way, that is all!
I do still have several growing plants in the beds, so all is not lost!

                                                                      Green amaranth

I harvested another big bunch of amaranth leaves and shared them with a neighbor.

I also pulled up two of my garlic plants. Having planted them in November last year, I was very curious to see what was going on underground. I have never grown garlic before and as an experiment, planted 12 cloves of ordinary store bought garlic. The only amendment I added to the soil was compost and I watered the plants with liquid sea weed once in a while.
I am very excited about the results. Granted, they are not huge bulbs, but I have seen bulbs this size in grocery stores and considering what I started with, I think its a fair harvest!!  I still have about 8 more bulbs in the ground and I am planning to let them stay there for a tad longer before taking them out.
                                                             Raw horsegram beans  - image courtesy Wikipedia

I also made sprouts last week. I am not sure if they are considered typical harvests. Instead of the usual green mung beans that I use, I sprouted horsegram (Macrotyloma uniflorum) beans.  Horsegram beans are legumes of the tropics and the subtropics and are known by several different names . Wikipedia tells me that these legumes were primarily grown as cattle feed, but they are very commonly consumed as sprouts in several regions of India. Like other beans, these little gems are high in protein and fiber and are also an excellent source of iron. This is a very drought tolerant vine. It can withstand prolonged duration of drought. The stems and leaves are used extensively as cattle fodder and once the crop is harvested, the plants are worked back into the soil to improve the  soil quality. 

sprouted horsegram  

I soaked a cup of these beans overnight and then let them sprout in a sunny corner of my kitchen for about 3 days, rinsing them periodically. Even after sprouting, these beans are pretty chewy. They can be easily cooked on the stove top or in a pressure cooker to make them softer. I used them to make a curry to go with rice and also used them as sprouts for a simple sprout salad with cucumbers and tomatoes. If you would like to try these, a quick trip to the nearest Indian grocery store should suffice! You can find some more information about these beans here.

Simple sprout salad with horsegram sprouts, chopped cucumbers, tomatoes and red bell pepper dressed with lemon juice, salt and cayenne pepper. Since this will be consumed for lunch at work tomorrow, I didn't add onion, else a little chopped onion would add more flavor.

For bounteous harvests from other gardeners around the world, visit the Harvest Monday roundup at Our Happy Acres.